Articles for January 2016

Book your trip to the top of One World Trade City at least a couple days in advance.  They give you a 15 minute window to get inside and you get bumped to the end of the day if you miss your window.  The view at sunset was spectacular and certain a must see.

New York City Quick Trip Tips

 

This is the first glimpse you get of NYC when you're flying in to LaGuardia and the image that has stuck with me the most.  My eyes could barely take in what I was seeing.
This is the first glimpse you get of NYC when you’re flying in to LaGuardia and the image that has stuck with me the most. My eyes could barely take in what I was seeing.
And then I realize exactly how big Manhattan really is!  Don't worry, you can easily explore the most famous sights on foot, subway, and boat in 2 or 3 days.
And then I realize exactly how big Manhattan really is! Don’t worry, you can easily explore the most famous sights on foot, subway, and boat in 2 or 3 days.
Book your trip to the top of One World Trade City at least a couple days in advance.  They give you a 15 minute window to get inside and you get bumped to the end of the day if you miss your window.  The view at sunset was spectacular and certain a must see.
Book your trip to the top of One World Trade City at least a couple days in advance. They give you a 15 minute window to get inside and you get bumped to the end of the day if you miss your window. The view at sunset was spectacular and certain a must see.

 

The WTC Memorial is very well done and extremely moving. Give yourself some extra time here.  You're just a couple blocks away from Wall Street, Little Italy, and Chinatown.
The WTC Memorial is very well done and extremely moving. Give yourself some extra time here. You’re just a couple blocks away from Wall Street, Little Italy, and Chinatown.
Central Park is 20 minute walk from Times Square (but a very short subway ride).  I share this, because 20 minutes itsn't very far but once you get to Central Park, there is infinitely more walking.  There are also limited eating options so be prepared.
Central Park is 20 minute walk from Times Square (but a very short subway ride). I share this, because 20 minutes itsn’t very far but once you get to Central Park, there is infinitely more walking. There are also limited eating options so be prepared.
The High Line is a terrific idea of building a public park on an abandoned rail line in the middle of Chelsea.  It offers a unique perspective of the city and an inspiration for how to repurpose the seemingly useless.
The High Line is a terrific idea of building a public park on an abandoned rail line in the middle of Chelsea. It offers a unique perspective of the city and an inspiration for how to repurpose the seemingly useless.
You have to make your Statue of Liberty tours months in advance.  However, the City Tours by boat will bring you really close and give you the opportunity for great pictures of the statue and Ellis Island among other things.
You have to make your Statue of Liberty tours months in advance. However, the City Tours by boat will bring you really close and give you the opportunity for great pictures of the statue and Ellis Island among other things.
Do yourself a favor and take a tour by boat.  Not only will you get some spectacular views, you get dropped off at a new locale every hour and might luck up and get a great guide full of useful info and history.
Do yourself a favor and take a tour by boat. Not only will you get some spectacular views, you get dropped off at a new locale every hour and might luck up and get a great guide full of useful info and history.
The Brooklyn Botanical garden is free on Tuesdays and a 20 minute subway ride from Mid town.
The Brooklyn Botanical garden is free on Tuesdays and a 20 minute subway ride from Mid town.
Be sure to visit the lovely pier parks on the Hudson River.  They are free and give you a great perspective of the city and New Jersey
Be sure to visit the lovely pier parks on the Hudson River. They are free and give you a great perspective of the city and New Jersey
Though a tour bus seems intriguing, we were warned by several sources that all you're paying for is to sit in traffic.  Use the subway and see the sights on foot.
Though a tour bus seems intriguing, we were warned by several sources that all you’re paying for is to sit in traffic. Use the subway and see the sights on foot.
Times Square is as overwhelming as advertised.   Prepare to fight off the souvenir hawkers and beware that photos with cartoon characters come at a price (though that price is up to you).
Times Square is as overwhelming as advertised. Prepare to fight off the souvenir hawkers and beware that photos with cartoon characters come at a price (though that price is up to you).
Tyler
The subway is extremely easy to use and can get you anywhere in lower Manhattan in under 20 minutes. We didnt have any problems but Ill pass on these words of advice: “If a subway car is empty, there’s a reason. Do as the other’s a find a different car.”

BCKFC Minimalist Challenge IX

By: Eric Fey

This past weekend my buddy, Biscuit, and I fished in Bayou Coast Kayak Fishing Club’s Minimalist Challenge IX Tournament. The tournament took place in Leeville, Louisiana, a place where we have had little luck in the past. This is a unique tournament in that it truly tests the skills and knowledge of one angler against the next. There will always be a certain amount of luck involved and some will inevitably know those waters a little better than their opponents, but this is about as even of a playing field as you can get in a fishing tournament. Every angler starts the day at the same time (6 AM), from the same launch, with the same baits. That’s right! Everyone gets the same baits and it only 6 of them. The baiting consisted of: 5 different color soft plastics, 5 jig heads, and 1 topwater. Only being allowed 6 total baits definitely changes up the fishing strategy for the day. My strategy going in was to get my 5 redfish in the bag before trying to stumble on a trout bite. That strategy quickly changed as I ran into some schoolies early in the morning.

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We started making our way through the marsh at 6 AM with the other 123 kayakers. We peddled for a bit to get away from the crowds but stopped after the first mile to fish a good looking area. I was able to pull in the first trout of the day rather quickly. I measured the trout at 15” and picked it up to move it to the fish bag. Time seemed to slow to a halt as the fish wiggled its way out of my grip and fell back into the water. I didn’t know what that would mean for the day, but I knew that it put me back to zero. I threw a few more times in the same area and picked up one more trout before moving on. We had a planned area to reach before the sun was high in the sky and we didn’t want to deviate.

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On the way out to the planned fishing grounds, we ran across a patch of marsh in the middle of seemingly open water that I just could not pass up. Since the tide wasn’t ripping and the wind hadn’t yet picked up it was easy to spot moving water. I tossed the Purple Haze Matrix Shad out into the current and slowly started my retrieve. The bite came and I was able to bring the trout to the boat. Unfortunately it was undersized but did let me know that the trout were in fact there. I anchored my kayak on the patch of marsh and fan casted in all directions until I got on to the school. I was able to catch another 10 trout before the bite ran out. Of the 12 trout that I had caught up to this point, only 7 were big enough to weigh and 1 of those 7 made its way back to the water. So with 6 fish and what I would consider to be a decent start to the day, we yet again decided to move on.

It turns out that we would never make it to our planned area. We ran across a cut that opened up into some flats on the edge of big water. The water was gin clear and the flat was somewhat protected from the wind. I stood up and let the wind push me over the flat while I eagerly searched the water for reds. It was long before I started spotting them. The flats were full of reds and it looked like they were willing to eat! The winning lure for the sight fishing was Green Hornet Matrix Shad. I was able to pull in a 18.5”, a 22.5”, and one that was just under 27” redfish. I then lost one lure and jighead on a hookset. My 4th red was caught blind casting around with the Shrimp Creole Matrix Shad pattern. At this point all of my baits were torn up or lost with the exception of one that I could not get the reds to commit to. I finished the day weighing 3 reds and 6 trout which totaled a little over 18 lbs. This earned me 27th place out of 125 anglers.

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I didn’t win but I consider that to be a respectable finish in such a challenging tournament. My big red weighed in at 7.3 lbs and made a run at big fish but ultimately came in 3rd. Biscuit finished with 2 weighable fish but chose not to take them to the scales. The top 3 places all weighed in over 44 lbs of fish!!!! That alone shows me just how much I still have to learn about kayak fishing. Over 1,200 lbs was weighed in by 78 anglers! We had a great time and got to meet some awesome people. I can’t wait for the next tournament. I want to give a big thanks to my sponsors, Hobie and The Backpacker, for the all the support. For anyone who might be interested in the sport and how to get started, go check out The Backpacker in Baton Rouge or Lafayette. But be warned, once you start, you won’t stop.

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I had to sneak in a picture of the cleaning table that my fiance bought for me this Christmas.  I hope you enjoy the video. I apologize for not having any front views of the fish. Once the speckled trout jumped out of the kayak on me that morning, I decided it was more important to get them into the bag.

Louisiana Marathon 5k Winner

5th Annual Louisiana Marathon Weekend

by: Nicki Klein

This was the fifth year for the Louisiana Marathon, a race weekend that gets bigger and bigger every year. This year there were five race options: a quarter marathon (6.2 miles), a 5k (3.1 miles), and a Kid’s Marathon (fun run) on Saturday, and a full marathon (26.2 miles) and a half marathon (13.1 miles) on Sunday. If a runner signed up and completed two races (one on Saturday and one on Sunday), they received a commemorative crawfish platter, the DejaVu award.

Last year I injured by back less than two weeks before the races, but was fortunate enough to be able to defer my registrations to this year.

On Saturday, I ran the Advocate 5k, finishing with a time of 21:05, and a first place overall female finish.
race_1786_photo_30293403Notice I look a lot happier before that kick at the end (see below)race_1786_photo_30304156

IMG_4742 (1)Celebrating with fellow Backpacker employee, Shelly

Although this was a HUGE achievement, and quite a happy day, Sunday was even better, when I paced my youngest brother through his first marathon.IMG_4751During the marathon

IMG_4765 (1)Before and after race pics

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In addition to my brother running the marathon, he ran the 5k the day before. My Mom and Dad were also in attendance, each running the 5k on Saturday and the half the next day. My family came all the way from Tennessee, a true testament to how great of a race weekend this is. I’m not the only one that thinks so…these races have even been featured in Runner’s World magazine. Lots of race options, beautiful scenery, unique awards, and the BEST finisher festival I’ve ever been to (and I’ve run a lot of races). I can’t wait till next year!

As always, thanks to The Backpacker for sponsoring me in all my wild and crazy adventures, and keeping me well stocked in gear (notice the Hokas-that pair has won me a 5k AND a 100 mile race now!)

Nicki Klein is a 100 mile runner, avid bicyclist, passionate camper, and enthusiastic about promoting all things outdoorsy.  Her home base is Baton Rouge, Louisiana and she is an ambassador for The Backpacker.

Big Bend

Backcountry Backpacking Big Bend National Park

by Nicki Klein

My boyfriend and I had plans to spend a couple weeks in Texas and decided that in-between visiting friends in Austin and the San Antonio area, we’d spend 3 nights in Big Bend National Park since neither of us had ever been.

Big Bend National Park is located in a remote part of southern Texas, and in some parts, is separated from Mexico only by the Rio Grande. For more than 1,000 miles, the Rio Grande forms the border between Mexico and the United States, 118 of which lie in Big Bend. In fact, the name Big Bend comes from a large bend in the river that bounds the park. The park covers 801,163 acres and is the largest protected area of Chihuahuan Desert topography and ecology in the United States.

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We knew we wanted to do some backcountry camping, and after perusing the National Park site, we decided on the Outer Mountain Loop trail, a 30 mile, 3 day, 2 night, strenuous hike. We arrived at the Persimmon Gap Visitor Center, the first visitor center reached in the Park when coming in from the town of Marathon, on Saturday January 2nd, in the late afternoon. The ranger advised us that we could pay our camp entrance fee ($25) there, and register for our primitive campground for the night ($12). She also suggested a nearby hike, and told us that she’d prefer we visit the Panther Junction Visitor Center in the morning to get permits for the Outer Mountain Loop hike since they’re closer to the trail, and more knowledgeable about the skills and requirements preferred for this trail’s hikers. With our fees paid, and the knowledge that the Panther Junction Center opened at 9am the next morning, we left and headed south to the two northernmost trails in the Park. Dog Canyon and Devil’s Den are a pair of narrow ravines in the Santiago Mountains, a thin range that forms a boundary between BBNP and Black Gap Wildlife Management Area. Unlike the trails we see in Louisiana that are tree lined and marked with paint (aka blazes), the shrubbery of south Texas does little in helping mark a path, so cairns (piles of rocks) are used instead. With only a couple of hours of daylight left, Brian and I walked and climbed along the steep, rocky hillsides of the two ravines before making our way back to the car.

 


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Our campsite for the night was at Nine Point Draw, just south of the trails we’d just hiked. The site is not marked with a sign (the ranger said they’d been having trouble with people messing with it—why, I’m not sure), but her directions were accurate, and we were able to easily find it. We had the place to ourselves, and quickly set up our tent, and began cooking in the bear box at our site in order to block the wind from delaying our dinner time. We both tend to be simple eaters, so for this meal, and both of our other dinners on this trip, we’d put a packet of instant rice in our cookware (an indistinguishable metal pot on an MSR Pocket Rocket), followed by a can of corn, a can of black beans, and a small can of salsa (either verde or red). We didn’t drain any of them because leaving the liquid creates a soup-like meal. Heat until hot, and that’s dinner. Each night we’d also use my Jetboil to (super quick-like) heat water for tea. Brian said the tea kept him warm in the 30 degree temps. I said he’s crazy. After dinner, we walked the mile or so from our site to the main road, than along the Terilingua Ranch Road. We kept our headlamps off as much as possible, although we had to use them a couple times to prevent twisting an ankle on the heavily rutted road. Brian prefers his Black Diamond lamp, and I prefer my Petzl Tikka RXP (although a word of warming-this lamp will absolutely lose its charge in cold weather-I sleep with mine loosely around my neck, under my jacket, to keep it warm). Wanting to be completely packed and ready at the visitor center at 9am to get our permits, we called it an early night and went to bed.

I woke up the next morning warm (I’d stuffed myself into my 0F sleeping bag and worn my Smartwool socks, Patagonia leggings, prAna pants, Smartwool baselayer shirt, prAna hooded shirt, Smartwool vest, the Northface Thermoball jacket, Northface gloves, and Backpacker beanie…I get cold easily*), but sore. The random piece of blue foam I’d slept on was absolutely not conducive to a good night’s sleep. Brian, on the other hand, was well rested having slept just fine on his Thermarest Trail Lite Sleeping Pad. *Side note: These are the same clothes I wore, in some variation, the entire trip. I fully attest to their durability and wicking capabilities. I never asked for Brian’s opinion, but he at least didn’t kick me out of the tent.

After we’d packed up and reached the Panther Junction Visitor Center, the ranger seemed apprehensive, to say the least, about our plans. She suggested that after caching water for the second half of our hike, and reaching the trail head, we’d be getting a late start on the 15 or so miles we’d need to complete that day. Instead, she suggested we do a day hike, camp at a primitive campground that night, then do a hike from the Chisos Basin the next day, backcountry camping on the South Rim, and hiking out our last planned day in the park. Rangers tend to err on the side of safety, but they generally have a good idea of what they’re talking about, so we went ahead and took her advice.

We decided to hike the Marufo Vega Loop, a trail that another ranger had told us was his favorite in the park. The NP site describes it as “a strenuous, but spectacular day hike or overnight backpacking trip.” With our daypacks packed with water (courtesy of Platypus hydration packs) and a few snacks and supplies, we headed out. Lucky for us, our trip in early January is a “perfect” time to go because the temperature never nears the 100F that can be reached at other times in the year. A sign at the beginning of the trail told us that the hike would be a 14-mile round-trip, close to the mileage we would have reached with our original plans.

The first section of the trail is flat, passing along mesquite, cacti and other brushy (and prickly) shrubbery.

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But after less than a mile, the rocks appear. And the uphills. And the downhills. Switchbacks. Etc. And it never really gets easy again. But…the hike was spectacular. Although the clouds never let us see much blue in the sky, we didn’t get rained on, and the wispy clouds kept us guessing what we’d see next. We’d occasionally stop and try and see where the
trail continued in the distance, but with all the switchbacks, cliffs, and canyons, what lay ahead was often a surprise.

 

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After about 7 miles, we reached a sign that said an extra .5 mile would take us to the Rio. I enjoy the “details” (the small extras), as Brian likes to joke, so it was no surprise that I insisted on the additional trip. That half mile was straight down, obviously making the .5 mile back to the main trail straight up, but with all the elevation variation throughout the hike, this wasn’t necessarily any more strenuous than anything we’d already done.

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We finished the hike in approximately 6 hours, and then got in our car and made the short drive to the Boquillas Canyon Trailhead. This was a short (1.5 mile roundtrip) hike that had been recommended to us by numerous people. The hike was quick, and beautiful.

 

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For our final activity of the day, we drove to the Hot Springs, also known as Boquillas Hot Springs. The spring is part of a former resort developed by J.O. Langford in 1909. There is a short hike one can take to this location, and there are primitive (aka not Honda Civic friendly) roads, but there is also a 2 mile unpaved road that most cars can take to reach the Springs. This is the one we took. Our vehicle was fine, but taking an RV or trailer on that road is not advisable due to the various twists and turns (signage explains this). After parking our car, we made the short walk to the spring, passing petrogylphs left by Apaches many years ago. The spring is frequently submerged by the Rio Grande, but when we got there, the water was low, and soaking in the 105 F water was perfect after almost 17 miles of hiking.

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NPS Photo

After the sun went down, we rushed to change, and drove off in search of our campsite at Government Spring, the closest campsite to the Chisos Basin Visitor Center, where we’d start our hike the next day. We followed what was already becoming a routine: setting up our tent, making dinner, and drinking tea and set an alarm for early in the morning.

We woke up to darkness and packed up our gear and made breakfast (oatmeal mixed with peanut butter, flax and chia seeds, Louisiana honey, and half a banana—the same thing we’d eat for breakfast everyday, and also what we both eat most mornings anyways). With our bags packed for the backcountry portion of our trip we headed 6 miles south to the Visitor Center, having never seen our campsite surroundings from the night before.

Because we’d already gotten our permits and reserved our campsite for the night, as soon as we parked the car at the Chisos Basin Visitor Center and Lodge, we grabbed our packs and hit the trail. We’d purchased a Chisos Mountain map at the Visitor Center the day before, and decided that we’d hike up the Pinnacles Trail, and down the Laguna Meadow Trail the next morning.

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Although we had more weight this first day, and the Pinnacles Trail is much more steep, we both knew our quads could handle the hike up Pinnacles better than our knees could handle the hike down. The day was very cloudy, and cold. In areas where the sun hadn’t reached, frost and (some) snow were visible.

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Within a couple hours, we we’d hiked the 6.3 miles (and a little extra because we got “lost” looking for our campsite) and were reaching Southeast Rim Campsite #1, “one of the nation’s best campsites, according to Backpacker Magazine,” and per the ranger at Panther Junction. The views were supposed to be amazing, but when we reached the rim, all we saw was a bright white backdrop—we were contained within cloud upon cloud.

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We set up our camp, the first time doing so in daylight on this trip, grabbed our daypacks, and spent the afternoon and early evening hiking approximately 10 additional miles along the SE, NE, E and SW rims, the Juniper Canyon Trail, the Boot Canyon Trail, and the Colima Trail. As the day progressed, so did the sun’s warmth, which I greatly appreciated, and occasionally the clouds would part, providing spectacular views of mountaintops (though we never saw what was below us).

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Although it was only 5p, we were both starving, and the temperature was dropping. Dinner and tea were quick, and we were in our tent shortly after 6. We’d set an alarm for shortly before 6am, and although 12 hours in a tent is a LOT of time, the shelter from the misty clouds and chill provided by our all season tent was MUCH appreciated.

After a less than perfect nights rest (stupid blue foam pad), I turned on my headlamp and poked my head outside the tent. All I could see was condensation and mist…again, we were in the clouds.

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We knew there was no point in trying to dry out any of our gear in this weather, so everything was packed up (we aired everything out when we got to our destination that night), oatmeal was eaten, and we headed along the South Rim Trail in order to meet up at the Laguna Meadow Trail junction and make our way back to the Basin. Other than a brief stop at the composting toilet (do your business, than put a scoop of compost on top and close the lid), we powered through the 5.8 miles back to the car. The clouds were less prevelant this morning, and we were actually able to see some of the Basin, although we never did see that “spectacular” view from our campsite (a Google image search later provided it was quite beautiful).

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Even with the cold and overcast weather, I absolutely enjoyed my time in Big Bend. The variety of landscape really surprised me. What I expected to see was cacti, and instead I saw foliage, many different types of trees, grasses, rocks, canyons, meadows, etc. It seemed every turn took us to a different landscape. Big Bend truly was a jungle in the desert, and it definitely exceeded my expectations.

Tips and take home messages:

With this trip, Brian and I learned what our hiking capabilities together truly were. As I mentioned earlier, rangers have to keep visitors safe, and they don’t know a hikers capabilities. Listen closely to a ranger’s suggestions, but also be confident in your own capabilities. You know your hiking style and experience better than anyone else. Looking back on our trip, we now know we could have done the Outer Mountain Loop trail as we’d planned. But, neither of us regrets the trails we did instead. We simply need to return to Big Bend to complete our original plan.

Be prepared for whatever park you go to. Know which roads your vehicle can handle. Research whether you need to cache water, get permits ahead of time or at the ranger station. Know what “the facilities” are like—in Big Bend, bring a trowel, and know you have to pack EVERYTHING out…that includes toilet paper. Sure, you’ll probably get away with hiding your waste under a rock, but don’t do it. Yuck. Make sure you have everything you need. Big Bend is remote: for last minute supplies, stop in the surrounding towns of Alpine or Marathon. There are some small gas stations in the park, but you’ll be paying much more for gas and amenities than you would at a locations outside the park. Finally, tell a responsible person what your plans are. Cell phone service is often unreliable in National Parks. All in all, PLAN!  Oh, and definitely break in your gear before you go–wear your hiking boots for a walk around the neighborhood, practice setting up your tent, know how to turn on (and off) your headlamp. Trying to get used to a new piece of gear in the wilderness is not fun, and can be downright dangerous.

If you plan ahead and are prepared, a trip to a National Park is a wonderful experience. And even if those plans change, that’s all part of the adventure. Enjoy it!

Nicki Klein is a 100 mile runner, avid bicyclist, passionate camper, and enthusiastic about promoting all things outdoorsy.  Her home base is Baton Rouge, Louisiana and she is an ambassador for The Backpacker.

Backpacker Fishing Team Casey Brunning Fishing Minimalist Challenge

Get ready for January and the Minimalist Challenge

We have waited way too long for the waters around south Louisiana
to reach the 50 degree mark, but it’s finally here.  In the first week of January, over two nights,
the water temps dropped from 66 to 51 degrees in some parts.  That drop is what many of us in the kayak
community have been waiting for.  Days
where you don’t have to leave an hour before the sun, where you can chase trout
all day rather than redfish, and where you have to remind yourself to drink
enough water, because you’re not sweating like you did on Christmas day. 
If you are chasing trout, now is the time.  The trout transition into our interior
marshes started over a month ago, but the congregation of trout has been
minimal.  You could go out there and
drift flats popping a cork, but the nonstop action has been minimal.  Well, with the water temps now in the normal
range for where they should be, there shouldn’t be any problem finding schooled
up trout.  Whether you are jigging the
draining marsh into Bayou Terre aux Boeufs or finding deep canals down in
Leeville, the action should be hot.
The easiest way to fill your bag this month is to find an
area where the marsh is draining into a deeper canal; this is an easy location
for stacked trout.  Another good saying I
heard years ago that has held true when waters reach the low 50s is “when the water gets colder, fish over
oysters
.” I am not exactly sure where I heard that saying, but it holds
true when the water temps drop.
Get ready for low tides, cold weather, and some fun camaraderie.
If you are fishing this month’s Minimalist Challenge down in
Leeville, your best bet for pulling off a win is to fill your bag with a limit
of reds and then chase your trout second.
If you can find some clean water around Lake Jesse and some redfish on
the way, then you are likely going to be in the running for some money.  Lake Jesse has been producing some good
numbers of speckled trout lately with jigs and plastics and corky style lures.
If you decide to go south for the tournament, don’t be scared of the graveyard
area, it’s a deep area with lots of snags, but it holds some beautiful fish
this time of year.  From Paddle Palooza
to last year’s Minimalist Challenge, there have been a lot of winning fish
pulled from the vicinity and if you don’t know where it’s at, just look for the
sunken barges and boats off the west side when driving across the Bridge to
Fourchon.  There are also some solid
areas to fish north of Leeville on the West side that have some deep canals with
flats on each side that are covered with oysters.  You will likely find some of the hometown
favorites scouring this area on tournament day and pre-fishing.
If you are staying local this month, Hopedale Lagoon is the
place for steady trout action, that is if the water continues its colder
temperatures.  There are oysters spread
out throughout the lagoon and a channel in the middle that you can follow by
the crab trap bouyies.  I am a big fan of
jigging matrix shad and quarter ounce or 8th ounce jig heads in the
“goon” but trolling works well too.  You
can also usually find a solid bag of reds along the eastern shoreline using
spinner, spoons, or gulp under a cork.

Shell Beach is also another hot location this time of year
for the kayaking community.  As duck
season comes to an end there is a lot of marsh areas between the intracoastal
and lake Borgne that hold a lot of red fish, but don’t forget to hit the mouths
of the canals you use to enter the marsh as they sometimes can hold a pile of
speckled trout.
No matter where you go this month make sure to dress heavy,
dress dry, and always have a spare set of clothes tucked under the deck in a
dry bag. I know it can seem like a hassle, but if you
happen to fall in, it
will be the best thing you take with you.
Being in 50 degree water with air temps in the 40s is not a recipe for a
good time, it’s a recipe for disaster.

 

Until Next Time,

 

Stay Safe & Catch1