Product Info and Reviews

Canoeing and Paddling Gear Checklist

Canoeing and Paddling Gear Checklist

Getting ready for whitewater or maybe just a relaxing paddle down a remote river? We’ve got you covered.

by: The Backpacker Editors

Clothing
Outerwear

  • waterproof/breathable jacket
  • waterproof/breathable pants
  • fleece jacket or wool sweater
  • waterproof gaiters
  • synthetic hiking pants
  • synthetic shorts

Base Layer

  • midweight long john top
  • midweight long john bottoms
  • long sleeve T-shirt
  • synthetic briefs
  • synthetic sports bra
  • synthetic T-shirt

Accessories

  • wool or fleece hat
  • midweight wool or fleece gloves
  • Footwear
  • boots, sneakers, or sandals
  • camp footwear (optional)
  • wool or synthetic socks (3)
  • liner socks (2)

Extras

  • sun hat
  • personal locator beacon (optional)
  • bandanna

Gear
Canoeing Specific Gear

  • tripping-style canoe (16-17′)
  • personal flotation device (PFD)
  • throw rope
  • paddle (straight or bent shaft) and spare
  • drybags
  • plastic map case
  • waterproof binoculars
  • duck boots (optional)

Other Gear

  • Internal or external frame backpack
  • three-season tent
  • down or synthetic sleeping bag (15° to 30°F)
  • inflatable sleeping pad
  • canister stove and fuel canisters
  • lighter and waterproof matches
  • cookset
  • eating utensils, bowl, and insulated mug
  • headlamp w/extra batteries and bulb
  • 32 oz. water bottles (2)
  • water treatment (filter, tablets, or drops)
  • pocket knife or multitool
  • compass or GPS (and map)
  • sunglasses
  • first-aid kit with personal medications
  • stuff sacks
  • assorted zipper-lock bags
  • bear-bagging rope (or canister)
  • insect repellent (optional)
  • mesh head net or suit
  • sunscreen (SPF 15+)
  • lip balm (SPF 15+)
  • toilet paper and trowel

Swamp Hiking / Paddling Gear Packing Checklist

Swamp Gear Packing Checklist

Ready to get wet and wild? This packing list will prepare you for any swamp trek.

by: The Backpacker Editors

Clothing
Outerwear

  • waterproof/breathable jacket
  • waterproof/breathable pants
  • fleece jacket or wool sweater
  • waterproof gaiters
  • synthetic hiking pants
  • synthetic shorts

Base Layer

  • cotton T-shirt
  • synthetic T-shirt
  • synthetic briefs
  • synthetic sports bra

Accessories

  • synthetic liner gloves

Footwear

  • camp footwear (optional)
  • waterproof hiking boots
  • wool or synthetic socks (3)
  • liner socks (2)

Extras

  • sun hat
  • rain hat
  • bandanna

Gear

  • internal or external frame backpack
  • screen tent or tarp
  • synthetic sleeping bag (30° to 50°F)
  • inflatable sleeping pad
  • trekking poles
  • canister stove and fuel canisters
  • lighter and waterproof matches
  • cookset
  • eating utensils, bowl, and insulated mug
  • headlamp w/extra batteries and bulb
  • 32 oz. water bottles (filter, tablets, or drops) (2)
  • pocket knife or multitool
  • compass or GPS (and map)
  • sunglasses
  • first-aid kit with personal medications
  • personal locator beacon (optional)
  • stuff sacks
  • assorted zipper-lock bags
  • sunscreen (SPF 15+)
  • lip balm (SPF 15+)
  • toilet paper and trowel

Dayhiking Gear Checklist

Dayhiking Gear Checklist

Ready your gear quiver for a for a full day outing.

by: The Backpacker Editors

ON YOUR BODY

  • Synthetic short-sleeve t-shirt
  • Lightweight synthetic shorts or trekking pants
  • Synthetic briefs or boxers
  • Synthetic bra
  • Wool hiking socks (liner socks optional)
  • Sunglasses
  • Sun hat
  • Gaiters (optional)
  • Hiking shoes or boots

 

IN YOUR PACK

  • Midweight synthetic or fleece long-sleeve top
  • Waterproof/breathable jacket or windproof shell
  • Waterproof/breathable pants (optional)
  • Extra pair of socks (optional)
  • Wool or fleece hat
  • Lightweight gloves
  • Sunscreen (SPF 15+)
  • Map
  • Compass or GPS
  • Headlamp
  • Extra food
  • Water bottles and water treatment (drops, tablets, or filter)
  • First-aid kit (with personal meds)
  • Firestarting kit
  • Toiletries and trowel
  • Personal locator beacon (optional)

COLD WEATHER ADDITIONS

  • Down or synthetic insulated jacket
  • Emergency shelter (bivy sack, tent, tarp)
  • Sleeping bag
  • Fleece pants
  • Insulated gloves or mittens

Snow / Winter Hiking Gear Packing Checklist

 

Snow/Winter Gear Packing Checklist

Get ready for winter with this comprehensive packing list.

by: The Backpacker Editors

Clothing
Outerwear

  • waterproof/breathable jacket
  • waterproof/breathable pants
  • insulated parka
  • fleece jacket or wool sweater
  • waterproof gaiters
  • synthetic or softshell hiking pants
  • fleece pants

Base Layer

  • expedition-weight long john bottoms
  • expedition-weight long john top
  • midweight long john top
  • midweight long john bottoms
  • long sleeve T-shirt
  • synthetic briefs
  • synthetic sports bra

Accessories

  • wool or fleece hat
  • balaclava
  • midweight wool or fleece gloves
  • heavyweight wool or fleece mittens
  • synthetic liner gloves
  • waterproof overmitts

Footwear

  • insulated camp booties
  • waterproof hiking boots (insulated is best)
  • wool or synthetic socks (3)
  • liner socks (2)

Extras

  • sun hat
  • bandanna

Gear

    • internal or external frame backpack
    • convertible or four-season tent
    • down sleeping bag (-30° to 0°F)
    • inflatable sleeping pad
    • closed-cell foam sleeping pad
    • trekking poles
    • white gas stove and fuel bottles
    • lighter and waterproof matches
    • cookset w/ heat exchanger
    • eating utensils, bowl, and insulated mug
    • headlamp w/extra batteries and bulb
    • 32 oz. water bottles (2)
    • water bottle parkas (2)
    • pocket knife or multitool
    • compass or GPS (and map)
    • sunglasses
    • first-aid kit with personal medications
    • personal locator beacon (optional)
    • chemical heat packs
    • stuff sacks
    • assorted zipper-lock bags
    • sunscreen (SPF 15+)
    • lip balm (SPF 15+)
    • toilet paper and trowel

 

  • pee bottle

 

 

Ultralight Hiking Gear Checklist

Ultralight Gear Checklist

Strip off the pounds with our ultralight checklist and hit the trail light as a feather.

by: The Backpacker Editors

CLOTHING

  • Synthetic short-sleeve t-shirt
  • Midweight synthetic or fleece long-sleeve top
  • Wind or rain shell (not both, under 12 ounces)
  • Rainpants (optional)
  • Lightweight synthetic trekking pants (zip-offs preferable)
  • Lightweight synthetic shorts (optional)
  • Down jacket (10 to 12 ounces)
  • Socks (two pair, one doubles as mittens)
  • Underwear (optional)
  • Wool or fleece hat
  • Sun hat

 

GEAR

  • Internal frame pack or frameless rucksack (3,000 cubic inches or less, 2 pounds or less)
  • Down sleeping bag (750 fill or better)
  • Short sleeping pad (60″, closed foam or uninsulated air mattress)
  • Tarp (siliconized nylon)
  • Trekking poles (if needed for pitching tarp)
  • Headlamp (small LED)
  • Water bladder
  • Alcohol or canister stove, fuel, and lighter (optional)
  • Cookpot with lid (titanium or ultralight aluminum)
  • Mug and spork
  • Water treatment drops or tablets (chlorine dioxide or iodine)
  • Bear canister (optional)
  • First aid kit with razor blade (instead of knife)
  • Map and compass
  • Toiletries and trowel
  • Stuff sacks (siliconized nylon)
  • Sunscreen

 

Hot Desert Hiking Checklist

Hot Desert Gear Checklist

From New Mexico to the Sahara, this gear checklist will have to prepped for any desert adventure.

by: The Backpacker Editors

Clothing
Outerwear

  • waterproof/breathable jacket
  • fleece jacket or wool sweater
  • synthetic or softshell hiking pants
  • synthetic shorts

Base Layer

  • midweight long john top
  • midweight long john bottoms
  • synthetic briefs
  • synthetic sports bra
  • synthetic T-shirt
  • cotton T-shirt

Accessories

  • wool or fleece hat
  • synthetic liner gloves

Footwear

  • camp footwear (optional)
  • wool or synthetic socks (3)
  • liner socks (2)

Extras

  • sun hat
  • personal locator beacon (optional)
  • bandanna

Gear

  • Internal or external frame backpack
  • screen tent or tarp
  • down sleeping bag (-30° to 20°F)
  • inflatable sleeping pad
  • closed-cell foam sleeping pad
  • trekking poles
  • canister stove and fuel canisters
  • lighter and waterproof matches
  • cookset
  • eating utensils, bowl, and insulated mug
  • headlamp w/extra batteries and bulb
  • 32 oz. water bottles (2)
  • water treatment (filter, tablets, or drops)
  • pocket knife or multitool
  • compass or GPS (and map)
  • sunglasses
  • first-aid kit with personal medications
  • stuff sacks
  • assorted zipper-lock bags
  • insect repellent (optional)
  • sunscreen (SPF 15+)
  • lip balm (SPF 15+)
  • toilet paper and trowel
tent and boat 2017

Annual Tent and Boat Sale

Our annual Tent and Boat Sale is here! Get ready for your upcoming adventures with new camping and outdoor products from your favorite brands! We’ll have special prices and packages available Saturday only!

Buy a $5 raffle ticket to enter to win a Goal Zero Sherpa 1250 solar generator package valued at $2000!  All proceeds will go to our local Habitat for Humanity chapters and their ongoing flood recovery response.

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You’ll also be able to learn more about and meet members of Everybody Plays Foundation, UpTown Climbing, Wonder South, Bayou Coast Kayak Fishing Club and Baton Rouge Group of the Sierra Club CommunityPaddle BR at our Baton Rouge store, and Southern Stone Indoor Climbing, LASOAR, and the LA Hiking Club in Lafayette!

 

tent and boat 2017

Backpacker Lafayette

What’s new at Backpacker Lafayette

Fall is just around the corner for South Louisiana and for our Backpacker Lafayette store that means tailgating at ULL, kayak fishing at Cypremory Point,  and getting ready for ski season!

New product is arriving daily including Columbia and Patagonia!

The all new Yeti Flip is here! Perfect for your kayak!

 

New prints in Patagonia Snap T!

 

We have the largest selection of Patagonia trucker caps around!

 

Patagonia Better Sweater Fleece Vest and zips.

 

Show your pride with Louisiana Local tees!

 

Scarves from Toad&Co and prAna are great Fall looks!

 

We offer free accessory installs on all kayak purchases including Marine Mat decking kits!

 

Fall Olukai shoes and boots are here!

 

The Brooks Ghost is perfect for running the new trails!

 

We have new styles but you know we’ll sell out soon!

 

Darn Tough socks just arrived!

 

Stay dry and look good!

 

We’re now a Thule dealer! Let us help you find the right fit to carry all of your gear!

 

Who’s ready for ULL tailgating? We are!

 

This Osprey pack fits in your pocket!

 

No need to be cold and wet when you have a TNF Triclimate!

 

The North Face Venture rain jackets are great all year long.

 

We have Wind Pouch, the super popular inflatable, treeless hammock!

 

Did you know that prAna guarantees you’ll LOVE their pants? Try our best-selling Stretch Zion and you’ll know why!

 

Burton means ski season isn’t far off!

Backpacker 42nd Birthday Sale September 17th

The Backpacker is celebrating our 42nd year of bringing South Louisiana to the slopes and we’re celebrating with a HUGE sale!

Backpacker TigerTown original Shop'74 edited
The Backpacker opened in September 1974 at the North Gates of LSU where Highland Coffees now resides.  Our founder, Dale Mathews, had been bringing his friends from LSU skiing, camping and hiking in the mountains of Colorado and now they needed a great place to buy their own gear!

We are unloading our Winter Warehouse for our Birthday Sale! Buy one Clearance Item at 50% OFF and get a second Clearance Item FREE!!! (Thats right!) Saturday and Sunday ONLY!! You don’t want to miss this sale!!

Choose from a huge selection of clearance apparel and footwear at 50% OFF and get another clearance item FREE!*

Image result for the north face borealis dijonImage result for sierra design tensegrityImage result for patagonia snap t print

 

 

*Selected free clearance item must be less than or equal to original retail price of 50% OFF item.

IMG_7537

What’s in my Pack: Music Festival Edition

by: Nicki Klein298498_10100350981462225_1754091_nLollapalooza 2013

As I was talking to my parents last night about what stove they should bring to Bonnaroo in a couple weeks (yes, I come from the type of family that goes to Bonnaroo together), I realized that packing for a music festival, especially a camping music festival, is very similar to packing for a backcountry trip. Sure, you may have your car nearby. And you COULD haphazardly throw all your stuff inside and hope to find what you need, when you need it, but if you pack only what you need, and do so in an efficient way, you’ll have more time to kick back and enjoy the festival atmosphere. So, in honor of music festival season, here’s What’s in my Pack-Music Festival Edition:

IMG_7537

A small (30L or less) pack, that has room for a hydration bladder. You want something that you can bring into the festival, that can fit all your stuff, but isn’t so big that you’re bumping into people as you dance and make your way through the crowds.

A hydration bladder. For camping, I love my 3L Platypus, but most festivals have water stations that are crowded, and the faucets can be leaky, and unpredictable (no water, and then boom, fire hydrant pressure). Because of this, I prefer a Camelbak bladder for festivals. The openings are large, and easy to fill. But, if all you have is a narrow-mouthed bladder, bring it. You’re going to need a lot of water, who cares if you hold up the line a couple extra seconds?

A tent. As festivals become more picky about the space they give groups, and as they start charging for parking spaces (in prior years, you brought a bunch of cars becuase parking was free, and you got as much space to camp as your cars took up), you’ll need to make use of the small space you have. That means it’s harder for each person to have their own tent. So, bring a couple big tents that take less room than a bunch of individual ones, and you’ll have more room for your group’s lounge space.

Sleeping pad. Sure, you’re going to be so exhausted you’ll probably fall asleep as soon as you lay down. But, you’re going to be doing a lot of walking, a lot of dancing, and not a lot of sleeping. You might as well make the time you are getting some zzzs enjoyable. This is essentially car camping, so bring a cot if you’d like, or just use a sleeping pad. I like the Thermarest NeoAir.

Sleeping bag. Most festivals are during the summer months, and it gets hot in a tent quick. You definitely don’t need a 4 season bag! Something like the Sierra Designs Backcountry Bed, or Sierra Designs Mobile Mummy, are nice options because you have the option to use as a blanket (Quilt), or stick your arms and lets out of the bag (Mummy). Some may simply opt for a blanket.

-Pop up canopy tent. A lot of your time will be spent in the center of the festival, but it’s nice to have a home base to return to, whether it’s for a quick meal, to meet back up with friends, or to relax in between shows. Having a canopy for all your friends to sit under lets you momentarily cool off before you head back out to the shows.

-Camp chairs. Set them up under your canopy. You’ll be happy to give your feet a rest. Try out the

-A cooler. You’re probably going to bring some food. And you’re probably going to bring even more alcohol. Keep it all cool for days on end with a Yeti or K2 ice chest.

Jetboil w/ Java Press. There’s food for sale at music festivals, but the lines are long, and the prices can be hefty. Save yourself a little time and money by bringing a camp stove and cooking a couple meals your self. Think instant oats in the morning, or ramen noodles at night. Or bring all the accessories and cook a 4 course meal. Oh, and having coffee first thing in the morning is a lifesaver.

-Plate, cup, spork, flask. Any trash you accumulate, you have to take care of. So don’t accumulate as much. Bring your own dishes and cutlery that can be reused.

-Pack towel. Good for cleaning dishes. Good for cleaning you.

-Camp suds. Good for cleaning dishes. Good for cleaning you.

-Bug spray and sunscreen. You’re going to spend days in the sun. Do yourself a favor and but on sunscreen. I can’t tell you how many people I see the second day of a four day festival and they’re burnt to a crisp because they didn’t apply (and reapply) sunscreen. And then they’re just miserable the rest of the weekend. Also, depending on what festival you go to, there may be bugs, so bring bug spray also. Or go with Sawyer’s combo spray that contains both sunscreen and bug spray, less to keep track of.

Hat. Use in conjunction with sunscreen. Try and get something wide-brimmed, to protect more of you. Plus, if you happen to come across ice, putting that into your hat feels like heaven after being in the dusty, heat for days.

-Sunglasses. Protect those eyes from the sun too.

Headlamp. So when you get into your communal camp site in the wee hours of the morning, you don’t walk through your friend’s tent. It’s nice to see where you’re going instead of guessing.

-Bandanna. Good to dip in cold water and put around your head, or neck. Good to use to cover your face if it’s dusty (think Bonnaroo or Burning Man). Good to use as a washcloth. Or a sweatband/headband. Etc. A bandanna is a very versatile piece of cloth.

Chacos. Your feet are going to go through a lot during a music festival. Mud. Dust. Grass. Rain. Chacos are easy to put on and adjust, and easy to clean. Even better, they’re recommended by podiatrists. They’re actually good for your feet, and you’re going to be on your feet. Your legs and back will thank you for wearing a shoe with support.

-Loose fitting, comfortable clothes. The clothes people wear to a festival vary greatly. You’ll see people in pink fuzzy bear costumes, wearing masks, and glowsticks. People wearing fringe, and feathers. Some people don’t wear much of…anything. I recommend wearing whatever makes you comfortable. I like quick dry and comfortable shorts made by companies such as prAna, Mountain Khaki, Patagonia, and Gramicci. I’ll pair that with a light tank (ExOfficio is one of my favorites), and I’ll carry a long sleeve shirt in my pack (in case it gets colder at night). I also opt for ExOfficio undies, because they’re ultralight and antimicrobial. I love people watching at music festivals, but I myself dress for comfort.

-Rain jacket. A little rain isn’t going to stop a music festival, but spending hours standing in the rain can still but a damper on your mood. I always have my Patagonia rain jacket stashed in my bag. It’s light, and folds into it’s own pocket. The North Face, Merrell, and other companies make similar and reliable products.

-Dry bags. Whatever I put in my pack, I first put in dry bags. Because if it starts raining, you may potentially be miles from your camp. Seriously, there are some big festivals nowadays.

-Solar charger. I’m all about living in the moment, and rarely use my phone during music festivals. With that being said, sometimes you need to get ahold of someone in your group to meet up, or you need to snap a couple pictures. You could always charge your device in your car, but that requires sitting at camp. Bring a solar charger with you and attach it to your bag. That way it’s always charged when you need it.

-Something to keep your phone waterproof. As mentioned above, sometimes you just need your phone. If you don’t already have a waterproof case on it, bring something you can put your phone in to protect it in case it does start raining. There’s nothing worse than having a worthless phone. Well, other than losing your phone and not having one at all (because that can happen too).

GoPro. If the camera on your phone isn’t enough, and you want a waterproof camera that, with the right accessories, can get your whole group in the picture, opt for a GoPro. They’re built to withstand tough environments, the way music festivals sometimes can be.

Of course there are some items on my list that YOU may not need (especially if you’re going to a music festival that doesn’t involve camping), and other items that I didn’t list that you can’t live without. But, in the almost 10 years I’ve spent going to music festivals, this is my go-to list. Pack right, enjoy the music, and as my mom would say, have a “groovy” time.

11538032_10205372613892938_5262398540613878778_nMy family at Bonnaroo 2015

Nicki Klein loves to run, especially in new places, and ESPECIALLY on new trails. She started running in 2011, ultrarunning in 2015, and can be found most days running around the LSU Lakes with her dog. Nicki also enjoys backpacking, hiking, rock climbing, cycling, SUPing, and generally spending as much time outside as she possibly can. Combining those activities with family, friends, and a good beer or two, and you’ve got her ideal day. Nicki Klein’s Instagram